Germany is not having much success at deporting migrants; the migrants either don’t have papers or they simply disappear.

Germany is not having much success at deporting migrants; the migrants either don’t have papers or they simply disappear.

Germany is not having much success at deporting migrants; the migrants either don’t have papers or they simply disappear.

Germany does not believe in detainment…and neither do the authors of the UN Migration Compact. As a result, Germany has handcuffed itself. A migrant scheduled for deportation will most likely simply vanish.

Viktor Orban and Visegrad were correct to reject “EU solidarity” regarding migration. Moreover, Hungary, Australia, Austria, Poland and USA are correct to reject the UN Compact for many reasons.

What a mess in Germany.

– A case example is the city of Brandenburg, where 49 out of 51 deportations have failed.

At present, 135 migrants in the city of Brandenburg alone are obliged to leave the country but will be tolerated. For 127 of them, the reason is quite simple: their deportation is suspended because of missing identity papers.

Without a passport a migrant cannot be deported according to German law until new papers are available, which often takes a very long time.

If the migrants have passports, many scheduled for deportation simply just disappear.

“At the moment it is like this: We order a plane and see if we can find the people. If not, the plane stays empty,” complains a city administrator.

How to solve this problem? Nobody in the town hall wanted to comment on that. But “it requires political solutions,” said the responsible alderman Michael Brandt, who did not go into detail.

In one ugly scene that made the headlines, the deportation of a Chechen family from Bradenburg failed. The father was sent back, but the rest of the family stayed in Germany.

The scene was dramatic after a special task force (SEK) escorted the rejected asylum seeker from his apartment. The man had entrenched himself with his wife and two children and was armed with a knife. Because of the deportation, the man threatened to kill himself.

After the family had been brought to the airport, a medical examination by the police was performed. But the woman suddenly became ill with medical problems. The airport doctor stated that she was unable to fly.

“It was decided to return the husband alone. The separation of a parent from the rest of the family is possible in principle, unless there is a risk of permanent separation.” said Brandt.

Brandt was clearly frustrated with the difficulty of deporting the migrants: “The conditions for repatriation are so high and complex that in the protracted proceedings a failure rather than an execution must be assumed.”

“If you put ratio and result into proportion, the current system is ineffective and inappropriate,” complains Brandt.

* There are some pro-migration writers in the Czech Republic who try to argue that the Czechs should accept more migrants from Greece because they claim that there is no migration crisis in the country.

Well it is true that there is no migrant crisis in the Czech Republic, but these EU enthusiasts miss the bigger point.

As Petr Robejsek said, “Yes there is no migrant crisis…and we want to keep it that way.”

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