Czech Republic and the so-called Afghan translators: Just in case one missed these details in the excellent article from the Visegrad Post:

Czech Republic and the so-called Afghan translators: Just in case one missed these details in the excellent article from the Visegrad Post:
Czech Republic and the so-called Afghan translators: Just in case one missed these details in the excellent article from the Visegrad Post:
 
👉 Petr Pelikán, an expert on Eastern civilizations, who serves as an advisor on migration to the Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babiš, agrees with Tomio Okamura.
 
According to Pelikán, the Czech army had twenty years to train its own translators. If they do not wish to stay in the Czech Republic and then migrate to the USA, for example, the Czech Republic will be playing the role of a smuggler, the expert believes.
 
Pelikán, who lived in Afghanistan for several years, also gave an interview for Reflex magazine in which he explained that people in Europe project their own values onto Afghanistan, mistakenly thinking that they are universal. According to him, the people in Afghanistan who want to improve women’s rights are a tiny minority.
 
The people employed by the Czech Republic were in fact more often informers than translators, according to Pelikán.
 
They were apparently not doing a good job. Those people, who had adopted a Western lifestyle, were telling the Czechs what they wanted to hear, but they were out of touch with the realities of the country, which is essentially a rural and conservative country with strong tribal ties.
 
What is true for the Czech Republic is also true for other European countries with regard to their Afghan helpers. They will join the ranks of the Afghan diaspora, who will try to pressure European governments to open their doors to Afghans who are allegedly oppressed by the new regime.
 
In Switzerland, the left is calling for the immediate welcoming of 10,000 Afghan migrants. The authorities have not yet given in. The United Kingdom, for its part, has announced its intention to receive 20,000 Afghans. The return of rejected asylum seekers to Afghanistan is likely to be problematic because of the European perception of the Taliban government.
 
It is time to change this perception, if we do not want parallel societies to play a more and more significant role in European countries, including in countries that are still relatively untouched. 👈